QWERTY and writing

The blog hasn’t been updated for a while, due to lack of time and energy by the author to use her laptop.

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That shouldn’t be an excuse though right? The author could always use her phone, and right she could. So this blog has been written here. Where the author shows her the different feelings she has had while writing these few lines.


Advantages:
Auto fill: a touch screen makes autofil an asset, the author here frequently doesn’t type the whole word she has inserted in this document..
The small keyboard means the author can type with her thumbs, requiring less space.
Can hide under her desk in class to type this.

Disadvantages:
Hard to go in between lines to edit a line.
Copy paste is a headache.
Can’t navigate between pages as easily.
So that seems to be it, now the author shall consider using her phone more often for typing outside texting.


Leaving that aside, here is some trivia:
A cell phone novel is literally a term for a novel written originally on text. A style originally created in Japan, even becoming popular.
“Love sky” by an author named “Mika” has had 12 million views online and has been published and turned into a movie.


It’d be interesting to know how far smartphones can replace laptops or desktops wouldn’t it?


 

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Thought: Internet translators are awesome.

As stated plenty of times on this blog, the internet is a world in itself. This contains communities where people are from all around the globe, different states and speaking different languages.

So it’s awesome when the author can research on any topic she likes on the internet by using a simple translator and view any page she wishes.


So let’s look at the most famous and most widely used translators: Google Translate

Google Translate is a free multilingual translator created by, you guessed it: Google.
The translator supports over 100 languages. Continue reading

Women and Technology: Hedy Lamarr

 

Women in the world of tech is actually a fairly common thing. No matter whatever the stereotype is. Today the author wants to write about Hedy Lamarr: actress, mathematician, inventor and total badass. Also probably the reason you can connect to the internet right now.

hedy-lamarr-4

Hedy Lamarr was first married to Friedrich Mandl, Continue reading

The happiness of learning and why everyone needs the internet.

I joined Hello Web a few months after joining college. It was mainly because I wanted to actually do something while I was in college. I didn’t even understand Mozilla that well before I approached my seniors to learn more.

I learnt that Hello Web was an initiative backed by Mozilla, and it aimed to spread web literacy.

Interested as I was, I didn’t fully see how it was important everywhere till I did my first on field job.
While I sat there and taught kids in a small room, with a few computers and as the kids sat and listened, I realised a vital reason why it was important to give these kids access to the web.

 

As I showed them how to Google search and how to use YouTube; Continue reading

More of the Web: The deep web

Deep Web

noun

noun: Deep Web

The part of the World Wide Web that is not discoverable by means of standard search engines, including password-protected or dynamic pages and encrypted networks.

“the biggest weakness of the Deep Web is also its greatest strength: it’s really hard to find anything”

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/Deep_Web

 

As given in the definition above, the deep web is the part of the internet that is not discoverable by regular search engines. The pages are unlisted and or encrypted, specific data on the deep web is a needle in the haystack unless you know the exact place to find it. It is not monitored and is most of the internet.

Though the Dark web is infamous for its drugs and trafficking, the dark web is a small part of the Deep web. In itself the Deep web mainly consists of unlisted content, such as paying service details, members-only sites etc. They are things you wouldn’t be able to access without a passcode or a decryption method, or things just not simply listed and lost in the web of the internet.

But you don’t want to hear about that much do you?

Yes, I’ll tell you about the Dark web, but not what you might think. Continue reading

The history of Emoticons

History of the Emoticon

🙂 The emoticon as we know today is much further than the basic symbols created by text.

These symbols, which seem to be just what we need to make up for the lack of facial expression in text for many people, have a long but quite fun history.

The first recorded use of the emoticon : – ) and : – ( online is in a text posted on the Carnegie Mellon University computer science general board on 19 September 1982 by computer scientist Scott E Fahlman.

19-Sep-82 11:44    Scott E  Fahlman             🙂

From: Scott E  Fahlman <Fahlman at Cmu-20c>

 

I propose that the following character sequence for joke markers:

 

: – )

 

Read it sideways.  Actually, it is probably more economical to mark

things that are NOT jokes, given current trends.  For this, use

 

: – (

 

However things go further back much before online communication

The original form on quick texting Morse code, had its own version of emoticons if you could call it that.

In the “The National Telegraphic Review and Operators’ Guide”, first published in 1857; the number 73 meant “my love to you”

In 1859, the Western Union Company set up the standard “92 Code.” Continue reading